Geological engineering

What Is Geological Engineering?

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Our guide today will focus on Geological Engineering, it’s career prospects, what it entails and the top schools that offer it. If you’re planning to pursue a career in Geological Engineering, you will get all the information to get started here. Before we start, let’s briefly consider what Geological Engineering entails.

What Is Geological Engineering?

Geological engineering is a branch of engineering that focuses on applying geological science and engineering principles to a variety of industries, including civil engineering, mining, environmental engineering, and forestry. By conducting geological, geoenvironmental, geophysical, and geotechnical studies, geological engineers often direct or support the work of other engineering disciplines such as civil engineering, environmental engineering, mining operations, and oil and gas projects.

They work on impact studies for facilities and operations that have a negative influence on the surface and subsurface environment. On these projects, geological engineers’ engineering design contributions and other recommendations have a significant impact on construction and operations. Geotechnical, geological, geophysical, hydrogeological, and environmental data collection are all planned, designed, and implemented by geological engineers. Manual ground-based procedures, deep drilling, geochemical sampling, advanced geophysical techniques, and satellite surveying are all examples of this.

Geological engineers are also involved with the investigation of past and future ground behavior, large-scale mapping, and ground characterization projects for specific engineering needs. These investigations lead geological engineers to provide recommendations and draft reports that could have a significant impact on the foundations of construction, mining, and civil engineering projects.

Rock excavation, building foundation consolidation, pressure grouting, hydraulic channel erosion control, slope and fill stabilization, landslide risk assessment, groundwater monitoring, and pollution assessment and remediation are just a few of the projects that have been completed. Geological engineers are also part of design teams that work on surface hazards, groundwater remediation, underground and surface excavation projects, and resource management. Geological engineers, like mining engineers, undertake resource exploration campaigns, mine evaluations, and feasibility assessments, as well as contribute to active mining projects’ continued efficiency, sustainability, and safety.

Read also: How Much Do Aerospace Engineers Make?

How Much Does a Geological Engineer Make?

Geological Engineers in the United States earn an average annual salary of $93,498 as of December 16, 2021. If you need a quick salary calculation, that equates to $44.95 per hour. $1,798 per week or $7,792 per month is the equivalent.

While annual wages for Geological Engineers range from $61,000 (25th percentile) to $124,000 (75th percentile), with top earners (90th percentile) earning $143,000 annually across the United States, according to ZipRecruiter. The typical compensation for a Geological Engineer ranges widely (up to $63,000), indicating that there may be numerous prospects for growth and higher pay dependent on skill level, location, and years of experience.

How To Become a Geological Engineer

A bachelor’s degree in engineering from a recognized institution including coursework in physics, geology, mine design and safety, math, and thermodynamics is required to become a geological engineer. Laboratory and field activity, as well as classroom study, are usually included in the program. Only a few colleges offer mining engineering degrees, and those that do must be accredited by the American Board of Engineering and Technology (ABET), which evaluates programs based on faculty, facilities, and curriculum.

For this job field, you can earn a master’s degree that includes a two-year program in more specific topics such as mining regulations and mineral resource development. A written thesis is frequently required for graduation. Master’s and doctoral-degreed engineers frequently teach engineering in colleges and universities. A mining or geological engineer does not need to be licensed for entry-level positions. A professional engineer (PE) must, however, obtain a PE license, which permits them to take on more independent and leadership positions.

A PE license requires a degree from an ABET-accredited engineering program and the passing of the (FE) Fundamentals of Engineering exam, as well as 4 years of relevant work experience and the passing of the Professional Engineering (PE) exam. Students who are interested in this field should take science and math studies in high school.

Top Schools Offering Geological Engineering Programs

If you want to become a Geological Engineer, the first step is to get a bachelor’s degree from a recognized institution. The following schools offer qualitative education in the field of Geological Engineering:

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Missouri University of Science and Technology has 14 degree programs in Geological Engineering. It’s a public four-year institution in a small town with a large student body. In 2019, 208 students earned 83 certificates, 73 master’s degrees, 38 bachelor’s degrees, and 14 doctoral degrees in Geological Engineering.

The University Of Utah

The University of Utah offers ten different degree programs in geological engineering. It’s a huge, public four-year university in the middle of a medium city. In 2019, 75 students graduated with 53 Bachelor’s degrees, 14 Master’s degrees, 6 Doctoral degrees, and 2 Certificates in Geological Engineering.

University Of Akron

The University of Akron’s Main Campus offers 11 different degree programs in geological engineering. It’s a huge, public four-year institution located in a midsized city. In 2019, 58 students graduated with 25 certificates, 15 associate’s degrees, 13 bachelor’s degrees, and 5 master’s degrees in Geological Engineering.

Colorado School Of Mines

The Colorado School of Mines offers six different degree programs in geological engineering. It’s a four-year public university in a big suburb with a medium-sized student body. In 2019, 142 students graduated with 84 bachelor’s degrees, 47 master’s degrees, and 11 doctoral degrees in Geological Engineering.

University Of Arizona

The University of Arizona has 14 degree programs in Geological Engineering. It’s a massive public four-year university in the middle of a big metropolis. In 2019, 71 students graduated with master’s degrees, certificates, and bachelor’s degrees in geological engineering.

University of Wisconsin-Madison

The University of Wisconsin-Madison offers six different degree programs in geological engineering. It’s a huge, public four-year university in the heart of a big metropolis. In 2019, 121 students graduated with 56 bachelor’s degrees, 51 master’s degrees, and 14 certificates in Geological Engineering.

Texas State University

There are four geological engineering degree programs at Texas State University. In a tiny town, it’s a major, public four-year university. 34 Bachelor’s degrees, 14 Certificates, 9 Master’s degrees, and 6 Doctoral degrees were awarded to 63 Geological Engineering students in 2019.

Northwest Missouri State University

Northwest Missouri State University has seven degree programs in geological engineering. It’s a public four-year institution in a small town with a large student body. Students received 10 Master’s degrees, 8 Bachelor’s degrees, and 7 Certificates in Geological Engineering in 2019.

Lone Star College System

Six geological engineering degree programs are offered by the Lone Star College System. In a small town, it’s a huge public two-year college. In 2019, 53 students graduated with certificates and associate’s degrees in geological engineering.

Michigan Technological University

Geological Engineering is one of ten degree programs offered by Michigan Technological University. It’s a public four-year institution in a small town with a large student body. Twenty Bachelor’s degrees, seven Master’s degrees, one Certificate, and one Doctoral degree were awarded to Geological Engineering students in 2019.

What can you do with a Geological Engineering degree?

Roads, mines and quarries, dams, petroleum production, railways, construction projects, pipelines, and forestry activities are just some of the things that geological engineers look into. Where pollution happens, they design clean-up and environmental assessments.

What degree do you need to become a Geological Engineer?

To work as a mining or geological engineer, you must have a bachelor’s degree from a recognized engineering institution. To work as a mining or geological engineer, including a mining safety engineer, you’ll need a bachelor’s degree from a recognized engineering program.

Is Geological Engineering degree worth it?

Geological Engineering is a well-paid profession with a wide range of career pathways and job titles. If you’re content with a bachelor’s degree, you can find work soon after graduation. With a BS in geological Engineering, you can have a lot of work prospects. Those with a master’s degree, on the other hand, have additional options.

 

 


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